Foreign Policy

The People's Republic of Rumors

  • By
  • Christina Larson,
  • New America Foundation
July 11, 2011 |

Last Friday, July 1, one familiar face was missing from the usual lineup of past and present Chinese Communist Party leaders at the CCP's 90th-anniversary parade: Where was former President Jiang Zemin? Was he very ill, recently deceased, or for some reason not wanted there? No explanation was given for his absence -- not even an official acknowledgment of his nonattendance.

The Green Leap Forward

  • By
  • Christina Larson,
  • New America Foundation
July 7, 2011 |

Among the most important high-tech endeavors at Shanghai Jiaotong University -- widely considered to be China's No. 2 engineering school -- is a cavernous showroom that resembles nothing so much as a futuristic Home Depot.

Paperwork Tigers

  • By
  • Charles Kenny,
  • New America Foundation
July 1, 2011 |

Fatality rates on roads in many developing countries are hideously high -- an estimated 130,000 people die on the roads in India alone. Buildings in those same countries often collapse without even the provocation of an earthquake -- the result of substandard construction. Many of these deaths could be prevented with regulation -- speed limits, car safety standards, building codes.

Shot in the Dark

  • By
  • Charles Kenny,
  • New America Foundation
June 28, 2011 |

In 2009, veterinarians at the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization made a remarkable announcement: Rinderpest, a livestock-borne disease, would soon be eradicated. OK, so maybe it wasn't front-page news, but rinderpest -- which causes animals to develop fever, followed by diarrhea and (frequently) death -- has over thousands of years been a recurring plague on human civilization.

The FP Twitterati 100 | Foreign Policy

June 20, 2011

... Here are 100 Twitter users from around the world who will make you smarter, infuriate you, and delight you -- 140 characters at a time. ... Rebecca Hamilton (@bechamilton) — Sudan correspondent and author of Fighting for Darfur. ... Steve Clemons (@SCClemons) — Washington impresario, Atlantic editor, and realist blogger at the Washington Note. ... Rebecca MacKinnon (@rmack) — Former Beijing bureau chief for CNN focusing on global Internet policy; fellow at the New America Foundation.

Green Shoots in the Killing Fields

  • By
  • Charles Kenny,
  • New America Foundation
June 21, 2011 |

After more than 100 years of abuse, the Democratic Republic of the Congo is surely the most dysfunctional country on the planet. It started the 20th century under Belgium's King Leopold II, who oversaw the deaths of millions through exploitation and disease in what was then his personal fiefdom of the Congo Free State, a tyranny made notorious by Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness. Independence in 1960 was accompanied by a vicious civil war and, soon after, the CIA-backed rule of Mobutu Sese Seko, one of the most kleptocratic leaders in world history.

The Drawdown Debate

  • By
  • Douglas Ollivant,
  • New America Foundation
June 20, 2011 |

The Afghanistan comments -- if perhaps not a fully articulated Afghanistan policy -- expressed by Republican presidential candidate Jon Huntsman (and to a lesser extent, Mitt Romney) provide an opportunity for a real look at a long-term U.S. policy for Afghanistan. The current debate over troop levels is good in that it focuses attention on the problem, but asking how many troops we should withdraw this summer and over the coming year is the wrong question, and much too narrowly focused. To date, our actions in Afghanistan seem to be reactive.

Chug for Growth

  • By
  • Charles Kenny,
  • New America Foundation
June 20, 2011 |

The myth of the smug teetotaler is no joke. Many of the most popular theories of economic growth in wealthy countries, dating back to the Protestant work ethic of Max Weber, emphasize the abstemious and sober virtues of the well-to-do. And from the 18th-century Gin Acts in Britain to Prohibition in 1920s America to a certain class of modern-day economists, there's a long tradition of blaming intemperance for the persistence of poverty.

Trouble in Khartoum

  • By
  • Rebecca Hamilton,
  • New America Foundation
June 17, 2011 |

The news coming out of Sudan grows bleaker by the hour. Prospects for peace look less likely now than at any point since the north-south civil war, Africa's longest-running conflict, ended in 2005.

Through Rose-Colored Corrective Lenses

  • By
  • Charles Kenny,
  • New America Foundation
June 14, 2011 |

The vast majority of global health problems do not consist so much of finding a cure as delivering one. Improving health in the world's poorest countries requires solutions that are cheap and simple to administer -- and the good news is that these are increasingly available.

Syndicate content