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Social Cohesion

Build With, Not For: A #CivicTech Manifesto

July 3, 2014

Crafting high-quality civic technology — projects and tools designed withsocial impact in mind — requires thought, creativity, and intentionality — the strength to ask:

“Will this project actually have social impact? Is it being designed for the social/cultural/political context in which it will be implemented? And if not, what steps do we need to take and what people do we need to substantially involve to get there?”

4 Tips for Organizing Unstructured Events Without Going Insane

July 2, 2014

Crafting high-quality civic technology — projects and tools designed withsocial impact in mind — requires thought, creativity, and intentionality — the strength to ask:

“Will this project actually have social impact? Is it being designed for the social/cultural/political context in which it will be implemented? And if not, what steps do we need to take and what people do we need to substantially involve to get there?”

On Accountability and Audience: Why We Didn't Have a Funk Parade Hackathon

June 27, 2014

Crafting high-quality civic technology — projects and tools designed with social impact in mind — requires thought, creativity, and intentionality — the strength to ask:

“Will this project actually have social impact? Is it being designed for the social/cultural/political context in which it will be implemented? And if not, what steps do we need to take and what people do we need to substantially involve to get there?”

Our approach to community-building in the name of civic tech should be the same.

So You Think You Want to Run a Hackathon? Think Again. (A Case Study on #CivicTech Events)

June 23, 2014



This article is an excerpt from a longer piece originally posted on Medium. Click here for the full story.


 

“Hackathons.” That’s one of the most popular answers to a question you haven’t asked yet: How do you organize your local tech community to do X/attend Y/engage with Z?

Civic Innovation Beyond Civic Technology

May 15, 2014


A sneak peek of New America's recent civic innovation brainstorm. More soon.


Technology has become part of nearly everything we do in our public and private lives. It shapes the way we connect with our friends and family, move through our cities and hometowns, and relax after a tough week. Technology also increasingly provides avenues for public interaction -- within our communities (online and off) and with our government. We use tech to vote, communicate with neighbors, access government services, follow politics, and participate in decision-making. “Civic tech” innovations have helped us fundamentally shift the way we understand our world and our place in it. But technology alone doesn’t cause this change. We do.

Leaning In or Reclining?

  • By
  • Evelyn Crunden,
  • New America Foundation
March 6, 2014 |
Programs:

A King of Beers?

  • By Markets, Enterprise, and Resiliency Initiative
December 12, 2012

In some respects, America’s market for beer has never looked healthier. Where fewer than a hundred brewers operated a generation ago, we now can count more than 2,000, producing a mind-boggling variety of beers. Yet just below this drinkers’ paradise, we see a market that has never been more closed. Two giant firms — Anheuser-Busch Inbev and MillerCoors — now control some 90 percent of production. At the same time, a few giant retailers — led by Costco — are rolling up control over sales. This concentration is already diminishing real variety in much of the country.

Where Karl Rove Was Right

  • By
  • Gregory Rodriguez,
  • New America Foundation
November 9, 2012 |

Give Karl Rove a break. His meltdown on election night may not have been entirely about Fox News prematurely calling Ohio for President Barack Obama. After all, the poor guy had every right to get upset while watching the Republican Party nominee’s campaign crash and burn.

For all intents and purposes, Mitt Romney trampled on Rove’s once vaunted GOP playbook–and leaves a weakened GOP in his wake.

Sometimes, No Se Puede

  • By
  • Alina Alcántara,
  • New America Foundation
July 11, 2012 |

Memo to Andrés Manuel Lopez Obrador, the Mexican presidential candidate who lost on July 1 by six percentage points: Losing is bad; not accepting your defeat is worse.

Losing well is an underappreciated virtue. Whether we’re talking about a family game of Monopoly, a summer softball league, or an intense firm whose associates vie for a promotion to be partner, the ability to lose gracefully, and concede defeat in a manner that isn’t destructive, is essential to community well-being.

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