Savings

Asset Building News Week, September 1-5

September 5, 2014
Publication Image The Asset Building News Week is a weekly Friday feature on The Ladder, the Asset Building Program blog, designed to help readers keep up with news and developments in the asset building field. This week's topics include the fast-food labor protests, race and poverty, public assistance, and savings.

Asset Building News Week, August 25-29

August 28, 2014
Publication Image The Asset Building News Week is a weekly Friday feature on The Ladder, the Asset Building Program blog, designed to help readers keep up with news and developments in the asset building field. This week's topics include back to school, inequality, and assets.

Asset Building News Week, August 18-22

August 22, 2014
Publication Image The Asset Building News Week is a weekly Friday feature on The Ladder, the Asset Building Program blog, designed to help readers keep up with news and developments in the asset building field. This week's topics include inequality, food security, savings, and employment.

Guest Post: How Much Would You Spend to Save $19 Million a Year?

August 21, 2014
Publication Image Editor's note: This op-ed was originally published in the San Jose Mercury News and is co-authored by Paul Tepper, Executive Director of the Western Center on Law and Poverty, and Paulina Gonzalez, Executive Director of the California Reinvestment Coalition.

California loses about $19 million a year from its public assistance programs to a surprising cost: ATM fees.
 
California's public assistance program, known as CalWORKs, provides job counseling, childcare, housing services, and modest cash grants to families with children. In fact, the average grant for one parent with two children is only $463 a month.

The Affordable Care Act and Asset Limits: What’s Left Undone

August 12, 2014
Publication Image Editor’s Note: This blog post is the third and final installment in a series by Julianna Lord, Emerson National Hunger Fellow, looking at how the ACA has removed barriers and streamlined access to public assistance programs. Julianna’s previous posts are linked at the bottom of the page.

A bill is on the table in Missouri that would allow elderly and disabled residents to maintain a modest level of savings without sacrificing their health coverage. HB 1223 would increase the state’s Medicaid asset limits from $1,000 to $5,000 for individuals and from $5,000 to $10,000 for married couples. These asset limits have been in place since 1968 and have not been adjusted for inflation in the past 46 years.

So why are Missouri lawmakers pushing to change these asset limits now, especially as the state continues to resist expanding Medicaid? According to the Southeast Missourian, the issue of low asset limits has hit close to home for Senator Dan Brown (R- Rolla), whose 84-year-old father is currently spending down his savings to cover his medical expenses but has yet to fall within the $1000 limit that would enable him to apply for Medicaid. "I wish he could have a greater asset limit when it gets to that point," Brown said. "I personally would love to see it raised." Nearly 8200 disabled and elderly Missourians, including Brown’s father, would become newly eligible for Medicaid under the new limits.

Asset Building News Week, August 4-8

August 8, 2014
Publication Image The Asset Building News Week is a weekly Friday feature on The Ladder, the Asset Building Program blog, designed to help readers keep up with news and developments in the asset building field. This week's topics include poverty, public assistance, and savings.

New Report: Child Development Accounts as an Early Childhood Intervention

July 22, 2014
Publication Image Properly designed Child Development Accounts (CDAs) can have lasting, positive effects on children's educational development and can improve their long-term economic outcomes. That's the argument of a new paper we're releasing today, "Investing in Children: Child Development Accounts as an Early Childhood Intervention," which was authored by two scholars at the University of Kansas' School of Social Welfare, Terri Friedline, an Asset Building Program Research Fellow, and Nik Schuetz. While much discussion of CDAs (also known as CSAs or Children's Savings Accounts; the terms are interchangeable) treats the accounts in isolation, Friedline and Schuetz argue that, to be most effective, CDAs should be situated within the broader context of other early childhood interventions like pre-K and Head Start.

New Report Highlights the Business Case to Make Youth Savings Work

July 28, 2014
Washington, DC – The Consultative Group to Assist the Poor (CGAP) released a report today that examines the business considerations for financial service providers offering savings products to young people. The report, “The Business Case for Youth Savings: A Framework,” analyzes the different factors that financial service providers need to consider when entering or being active in the youth savings market. 
 

Asset Building News Week, June 23-27

June 27, 2014
Publication Image The Asset Building News Week is a weekly Friday feature on The Ladder, the Asset Building Program blog, designed to help readers keep up with news and developments in the asset building field. This week's topics include workforce and poverty, savings, tax policy, and housing.

Will GAO Examine Savings Bond Policy?

June 24, 2014
Publication Image We've long been in favor of expanding access to savings bonds. They're well-known, secure and historically have been available to everyone. Unfortunately, that's not really the case anymore. The Treasury Department eliminated retail sales of paper bonds a few years back and also ended a payroll purchase program. Treasury seems to have preferred to try to skip a generation by moving all sales online, through their TreasuryDirect portal. Unfortunately, this creates all manner of issues for Americans.
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