Public Infrastructure

Chicago on the Yangtze

  • By
  • Christina Larson,
  • New America Foundation
August 19, 2010 |

Yan Qi spent most of her childhood living with her grandparents in a mountain village on the outskirts of what is now the world's fastest-growing city. It was always raining, she remembers, and nothing much seemed to happen. With no bridges to cross the fast-flowing Yangtze River, the nearby town center -- today a 40-minute drive away -- took several hours to reach by long-distance bus.

Beyond City Limits

  • By
  • Parag Khanna,
  • New America Foundation
August 19, 2010 |

The 21st century will not be dominated by America or China, Brazil or India, but by the city. In an age that appears increasingly unmanageable, cities rather than states are becoming the islands of governance on which the future world order will be built. This new world is not -- and will not be -- one global village, so much as a network of different ones.

Growing Shortages of Water Threaten China’s Development

  • By
  • Christina Larson,
  • New America Foundation
July 26, 2010 |

On a recent visit to the Gobi desert, which stretches across China’s western Gansu province, I came upon an unusual sign. In the midst of a dry, sandy expanse stood a large billboard depicting a settlement the government intended to build nearby — white buildings surrounded by lush, green, landscaped lawns, and in the center a vast, gleaming blue reservoir. The illustration’s bright colors were quite unlike the actual surroundings, which consisted of dull sky that faded into a horizon of undulating, parched-brown hillsides.

Renewable Energy Cannot Drive the Recovery

  • By
  • Samuel Sherraden,
  • New America Foundation
July 28, 2010

The promotion of the renewable energy industry is central to the Recovery Act and the Obama administration's broader economic recovery program, but it is unlikely to create enough jobs or have a large enough domestic multiplier effect to contribute significantly to the economic recovery. It reflects an ambition to transform the economy into a green energy leader of the 21st century and tackle climate change. But these investments are a questionable short- or medium-term generator of growth and jobs.

A Year Later, Philadelphia Awarded $6.4 Million

July 2, 2010

On June 23, 2009, seemingly another sunny day in Philadelphia, Sascha Meinrath and Dan Meredith, respectively Open Technology Initiative Director and Technologist, disembarked from Amtrak at the 30th Street Station.

With Open Technology Initiative Partnership, Philadelphia Receives $6.4 Million for Public Computer Centers

July 2, 2010

Today, President Barack Obama awarded a $6.4 Million grant to the City of Philadelphia to create or enhance 77 public computer centers. This project will greatly expand digital literacy in North, West and South Philadelphia to reach over 14,500 of the most vulnerable residents of the City.

The Case for an Infrastructure-Led Jobs and Growth Strategy

  • By
  • Sherle R. Schwenninger,
  • New America Foundation
February 23, 2010

As the Senate takes up a greatly scaled down $15 billion jobs bill stripped of all infrastructure spending, the nation should consider the compelling case for public infrastructure investment offered by Governors Arnold Schwarzenegger (R-CA) and Ed Rendell (D-PA).  Appearing on ABC's Programs:

Goodbye, Bullet Trains and Windmills

  • By
  • Michael Lind,
  • New America Foundation
June 8, 2010 |

The U.S. economy is in trouble. Disappointing employment growth figures show that mass unemployment may be with us for some time. The stimulus spending in the U.S. was far too small and depended too much on tax cuts. State budget crises that result primarily from the Wall Street-created global crash, not statehouse mistakes, may yet cripple the economy, as the effect of federal stimulus spending wears off.

U.S. and Europe: Shaping a New Model of Economic Development

  • By
  • Sherle R. Schwenninger,
  • New America Foundation
June 1, 2010

The Great Recession of 2008-09 has put enormous strain on the social contracts of Western economies. This paper provides an American perspective on how well the social welfare systems of the United States and the European Union countries have performed in cushioning their populations against the economic dislocations associated with the Great Recession and how effective U.S. and European policy has been in softening the severity of the recession and in creating the conditions for future socio-economic progress.

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