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Case Study: Practical Principles to Encourage a Civic Youth Pipeline

July 24, 2014


Kids in Sayada, Tunisia working on a plan for their Community Wireless Network - Photo Credit: Ryan Gerety

When determining if a project or process was successful, frequently we look at what the outcomes were, detailed statistics about what happened, as well as thinking about if the experiment or intervention can be sustained or scaled?  More often than not though it’s the impact of the process itself that matters.

Process is a huge part of everyday life in communities. Whether you are organizing a neighborhood block party or attending a public meeting, you are engaging with the governance processes and community structures that comprise our lives. These engagement opportunities can be few and far between, and frequently lacking sufficient pathways to engage with young people. Framing each of these engagements as opportunities to enter into civic process, there is an opportunity to expand the civic pipeline for youth. This can be as simple as experimenting with including youth in the civic processes that impact their communities.

4 Tips for Organizing Unstructured Events Without Going Insane

July 2, 2014

Crafting high-quality civic technology — projects and tools designed withsocial impact in mind — requires thought, creativity, and intentionality — the strength to ask:

“Will this project actually have social impact? Is it being designed for the social/cultural/political context in which it will be implemented? And if not, what steps do we need to take and what people do we need to substantially involve to get there?”

Neither Bottom-Up Nor Top-Down: 3 Tips for Horizontal Organizing

June 30, 2014

Crafting high-quality civic technology — projects and tools designed withsocial impact in mind — requires thought, creativity, and intentionality — the strength to ask:

“Will this project actually have social impact? Is it being designed for the social/cultural/political context in which it will be implemented? And if not, what steps do we need to take and what people do we need to substantially involve to get there?”

On Accountability and Audience: Why We Didn't Have a Funk Parade Hackathon

June 27, 2014

Crafting high-quality civic technology — projects and tools designed with social impact in mind — requires thought, creativity, and intentionality — the strength to ask:

“Will this project actually have social impact? Is it being designed for the social/cultural/political context in which it will be implemented? And if not, what steps do we need to take and what people do we need to substantially involve to get there?”

Our approach to community-building in the name of civic tech should be the same.

So You Think You Want to Run a Hackathon? Think Again. (A Case Study on #CivicTech Events)

June 23, 2014



This article is an excerpt from a longer piece originally posted on Medium. Click here for the full story.


 

“Hackathons.” That’s one of the most popular answers to a question you haven’t asked yet: How do you organize your local tech community to do X/attend Y/engage with Z?

Citizen Science : A Pathway to Civic Action

June 12, 2014
At last week’s Personal Democracy Forum, Matt Stempeck who has led work on participatory civic projects out of MIT’s Center for Civic Media, moderated a panel on Citizen Science.

Civic Innovation: a New America-wide conversation

June 2, 2014
Image by slobikelane via Flickr
Are community tool libraries (shared work equipment, like that pictured above) a civic innovation? Image by slobikelane.

PRESS RELEASE: New Tools Support Communities to Build Own Wireless Communications Infrastructure

October 1, 2013

WASHINGTON, DC — New America Foundation’s Open Technology Institute (OTI) today released the first round of its Commotion Construction Kit, a “do it ourselves” guide for building wireless communications infrastructure. The materials are part of the Commotion project, an open-source communications toolkit that uses mobile phones, computers, and other wireless devices to create decentralized mesh networks and share local services.

RELEASE: New Tools Support Communities to Build Own Wireless Communications Infrastructure

October 1, 2013

WASHINGTON, DC — New America Foundation’s Open Technology Institute (OTI) today released the first round of its Commotion Construction Kit, a “do it ourselves” guide for building wireless communications infrastructure. The materials are part of the Commotion project, an open-source communications toolkit that uses mobile phones, computers, and other wireless devices to create decentralized mesh networks and share local services.

PRESS RELEASE: Open Technology Institute Launches New Version of Commotion: Free, Open Source, Wireless Networking Software

September 17, 2013

WASHINGTON, DC – The New America Foundation's Open Technology Institute (OTI) announced today the latest version of Commotion – a free, open source, wireless networking platform.

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