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Middle East

The Tragedy of the Euro and the Middle East

  • By
  • Afshin Molavi,
  • New America Foundation
December 1, 2011 |

For the past several years, Italy under Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi resembled a political comic opera, with a larger-than-life character of ravenous appetites and tragic hubris. But the recent "political death" of Mr Berlusconi represents only the end of Act One. Two more acts remain, and this drama could turn from comedy to tragedy quickly.

Islam and the West Through the Eyes of Two Women

  • By
  • Eliza Griswold,
  • New America Foundation
January 27, 2012 |

Very few of the heroes and villains made famous in the wars of the past decade are women. Of the scant exceptions, two of the most fascinating are the subjects of Deborah Scroggins’s thoughtful double biography, “Wanted Women.”

One is Ayaan Hirsi Ali, the Somali-born thinker and neoconservative darling; the other is Aafia Siddiqui, a Pakistani neuroscientist who, in 2010, was sentenced to 86 years in prison for her assault on American personnel in Afghanistan. She is known as Al Qaeda’s highest-ranking female associate.

Programs:

Israel and the Arab Uprisings: Challenges in a Changing Middle East

January 20, 2012

 

REMARKS AS PREPARED FOR DELIVERY

 

Israel and the Arab Uprisings: Challenges in a Changing Middle East

Remarks to the Council on Foreign Relations:

The David Rockefeller Studies Program Roundtable Series

~~~

Daniel Levy

Senior Research Fellow; Co-Director, Middle East Task Force, New America Foundation

Israeli Democracy in Peril

  • By
  • Daniel Levy,
  • New America Foundation
January 6, 2012 |

While 2011 will be remembered as a tumultuous year in the Middle East, that most headline-grabbing of regional issues—the Israel-Palestine conflict—barely merits a footnote. The glacial pace of developments on that front could not have been more out of sync with the surrounding frenzy. There has been no Palestinian Spring to date (although there have been weekly demonstrations in Palestinian villages impacted by Israeli land confiscations) and the entire year passed without even a day of Palestinian-Israeli peace talks (those were in part resumed on Jan.

Israeli-Palestinian Talks in Jordan: Working Hard at Treading Water

  • By
  • Daniel Levy,
  • Leila Hilal,
  • New America Foundation
January 5, 2012 |

On January 6, 2011, then Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak invited Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to Sharm el Sheikh in an effort to resuscitate the flagging peace process. Egypt for many years played the role of regional protector of an Israeli-Palestinian peace process, which was extremely heavy on process while being ever-more transparently light on delivering peace. It is a role that the new Egypt is unlikely to volunteer for.

Iraq Is a Mess. But Leaving Was the Right Call

  • By
  • Douglas Ollivant,
  • New America Foundation
December 23, 2011 |

Let us stipulate some ugly facts up front. Iraq remains a weak state. The political institutions are—charitably—immature. The business climate is not overly attractive and corruption is endemic. Were it not for oil, there would be no real economy. There is a serious terrorism problem. Relationships with all the neighboring states are problematic. Sectarian divides remain tense, with some key fault lines unresolved. The country’s armed forces remain incapable of defending its international borders.

The Last Straw for Bedouin in Jerusalem's Periphery?

  • By
  • Jonathan Guyer,
  • New America Foundation
December 23, 2011 |

United Nations officials have issued a warning that the Government of Israel's plans for Palestinian Bedouin communities living in Jerusalem's periphery could constitute "mass forcible transfers" and "grave breaches" of international law. A pending plan in the West Bank threatens to displace Khan al-Ahmar, a Bedouin village of refugees originally from Israel's south, pushed off their indigenous land in the early 1950's. Khan al-Ahmar lies on the side of a major West Bank thoroughfare and is sandwiched between the Israeli settlement of Maale Adumin and Jerusalem.

Did We Win the Iraq War?

  • By
  • Fred Kaplan,
  • New America Foundation
December 16, 2011 |

As the last American troops leave Iraq (a remarkable phrase, which many once doubted would ever be uttered), two questions come to mind: Was the war worth it? And did we, in any sense, win?

The two questions, of course, are related: The first concerns cost, the second benefits. But however you do the calculation, it's clear that the decision to invade Iraq was a major strategic blunder—and that the policies we pursued in the early months of the occupation tipped the blunder into a catastrophe.

Democracy Promotion: Done Right, A Progressive Cause

  • By
  • Rosa Brooks,
  • New America Foundation
December 14, 2011 |

By the beginning of the Obama Administration, democracy promotion had become a rather tarnished idea, and understandably so. Like Islam or Christianity, much blood has been shed beneath its banner. It may be true that democracies don’t go to war with one another, but they certainly go to war, and their wars kill people just as dead as the wars undertaken by illiberal regimes. Anyone on the political left can tell the story: During the Cold War, the United States fought endless proxy wars and engaged in a great deal of overt and covert mischief, all in the name of democracy.

Israel's Chilling Relations with the U.S.

  • By
  • Jonathan Guyer,
  • New America Foundation
December 6, 2011 |

The Israeli government has come under criticism from both the Obama administration and American Jewish communities over the past week – the latter focused on a bizarre advertisement campaign aimed at the US diaspora.

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