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Latin America

Brazil Separates Into a World of Black and White

  • By
  • Gregory Rodriguez,
  • New America Foundation
September 3, 2006 |

RIO DE JANEIRO -- Even as U.S. society struggles to move beyond its confining binary view of race -- white versus black with nothing in between -- Brazil, a country where the celebration of racial mixture has long been a central part of the national self-image, may be heading in the opposite direction.

Cuba Libre!

  • By
  • Gregory Rodriguez,
  • New America Foundation
August 6, 2006 |

Fidel Castro once famously acknowledged that his revolution required an "enemy," an "antithesis," a "counterrevolution" in order to develop. For nearly half a century, Cuban Americans have also largely defined themselves, socially and politically, in opposition to their enemy, Castro’s regime.

When Populism Goes Too Far

  • By
  • Gregory Rodriguez,
  • New America Foundation
July 9, 2006 |

MORELIA, MEXICO -- Not until last week did I understand why populism -- the political philosophy that promotes the interests of the masses over those of the elite -- is so often tarnished in practice by anti-democratic tendencies. After all, one would think that a true populist would be the ultimate democrat; he would want the people to have real electoral power.

Bush's Border Shift Needs Policing

  • By
  • James Pinkerton,
  • New America Foundation
May 16, 2006 |

So George W. Bush wants to get tough on border enforcement. Nothing like an approval rating in the low 30s -- including a hemorrhage in his conservative base -- to concentrate the political mind.

Bush talked like a cop last night, but, of course, he also reiterated his support for a guest-worker plan, which everyone knows will eventually morph into an amnesty for illegal immigrants. So Bush is a cop who wants to let the crooks go free. One is reminded of the old adage: "A man convinced against his will is of the same opinion still."

Can-do Spirit Fuels Immigrants

  • By
  • Gregory Rodriguez,
  • New America Foundation
May 7, 2006 |

Throughout the 20th century, competing interests sought to portray Mexican immigrants in diametrically opposed ways. In 1911, a congressional panel known as the Dillingham Commission concluded that railroad companies such as Southern Pacific and Santa Fe preferred to hire Mexican workers because of their alleged "passive obedience" and reluctance to engage in "concerted action."

We'd Better Heed Our Own Backyard

  • By
  • James Pinkerton,
  • New America Foundation
May 4, 2006 |

For the United States, the second most important foreign policy developments are occurring in South America. Maybe soon, the most important.

Time for a Tex-Mex Marshall Plan

  • By
  • Steven Hill,
  • New America Foundation
April 23, 2006 |

Immigration issues are always ripe for demagoguery, particularly in an election year. But the solution to the very real problems along the U.S.-Mexican border can be found, ironically, in that other part of the world that American demagogues love to ridicule: old Europe.

Two years ago, the European Union admitted 10 new members. Like Mexico, all of these nations were poor, some of them fairly backward and most recently ravaged by war and communist dictatorship.

What Not to Do in the Middle East

Monday, April 17, 2006 - 12:15pm
Central America is the oldest region of U.S. external influence. It also remains one of the most important for U.S. interests. The history of American involvement in the region is a mixed one, with great successes, but also tragic failures and crimes. In recent decades, American supremacy has been maintained, the Communist threat in the region defeated, and forms of democracy established.

Mexico's Bluster, Mexico's Pride

  • By
  • Gregory Rodriguez,
  • New America Foundation
January 15, 2006 |

Let's face it, if an unarmed U.S. citizen had been shot in the back and killed by a Mexican federal agent at the border, the American public would be up in arms. Colorado Congressman Tom Tancredo would probably call for a punitive military expedition into Mexico, and television's Bill O'Reilly and Lou Dobbs would be right behind him.

Chaos and Constitution

  • By
  • Barry C. Lynn,
  • New America Foundation
February 1, 2003 |

You can buy a plastic-bound copy of the Venezuelan Constitution for 60 cents, a leather-clad copy for $3, a coffee-table edition for $5. Not that you really need a copy of your own, since someone standing near you on the subway in Caracas will have one in his pocket. Or you can always listen to one of the ongoing debates at a downtown park. "Look at this article," someone will shout, and a half dozen people will flip through the constitution's 35,000 words and 350 articles to find the pertinent passage. "Yes," someone else will cry out. "But this one here is more to the point."

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