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India

How India’s Economic Rise Could Bolster America’s Economy | Slate

  • By
  • Zachary Karabell,
  • New America Foundation
July 2, 2014 |
Narendra Modi’s pro-reform government could do for the next decade what China did at the turn of the millennium.
Programs:

Commotion Wireless as a Community Technology: Lessons from Community Technologists in India and Nepal

June 16, 2014
Publication Image The Open Technology Institute (OTI) gathered innovative community technologists and organizers from India and Nepal for the first international Commotion workshop in June, 2013. By gathering participants from a variety of community-based technology training and wireless networking projects, OTI and the participating groups were able to exchange experiences, training models and technologies.

Optimism for Afghanistan's Women

  • By
  • Evelyn Crunden,
  • New America Foundation
May 8, 2014 |
Programs:

Boots on the Ground or Robots in the Sky

  • By
  • Evelyn Crunden,
  • New America Foundation
January 22, 2014 |
Programs:

The Limits of India's Historic Election

  • By
  • Evelyn Crunden,
  • New America Foundation
April 24, 2014 |
Programs:

Can Mobile-Enabled Savings Products Bridge the Youth Financial Services Gap?

April 29, 2013
Publication Image

Editor's note: This post was authored by Julia Arnold, a Research Fellow with the Global Assets Project, and originally appeared on the Center for Financial Inclusion's blog.

Many of the challenges to saving faced by the world’s poorest people were highlighted in the recent Washington Post article Microsavings Programs Build Wealth, Pennies at a Time.  Among others, the article articulated two especially salient points around microsavings: 1) we know the poor save, and 2) savings can help poor people withstand shocks to their income (such as unexpected medical emergencies or job loss) without going further into debt and poverty. However, low-income people tend to rely on informal methods of savings, often putting their money at risk of being lost, stolen, or ruined by floods or rodents. Having a safe, reliable place to save is both beneficial to and desired by the world’s poorest people. 

India-Pakistan Trade Relations

  • By Mohsin Khan, Senior Fellow, Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East, Atlantic Council
January 29, 2013

One of the more significant recent economic developments in South Asia was the revival of trade talks between India and Pakistan in 2011. A question frequently raised is why India and Pakistan trade so little with each other despite the existence of common history, language, culture, and long borders. Economic theory and evidence from around the world would predict that trade between the two largest economies in South Asia would be far greater than its current level of around $2.5 billion.

Enhancing India-Pakistan Trade

  • By Nisha Taneja, Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations (ICRIER), New Delhi
January 29, 2013

The trade normalization process between India and Pakistan will undoubtedly open new trade opportunities. This study assesses trade possibilities between the two countries, examines the physical and regulatory impediments to realizing the trade potential, and suggests how the trade potential can be realized. The main findings and recommendations are summarized below.

Ecological Cooperation in South Asia: The Way Forward

  • By Saleem H. Ali, University of Vermont and University of Queensland, Australia
January 14, 2013

The greatest loss of human life and economic damage suffered by South Asia since 2001 has not been due to terrorism and its ensuing conflicts, but rather due to natural disasters ranging from the 2005 Kashmir earthquake and the Indus floods of 2010 to seasonal water shortages and drought.  Although such calamities themselves might not be preventable, their human impact can certainly be mitigated. This report argues that such mitigation of environmental stresses is possible only through regional approaches to ecological cooperation.

Mobile Networks are Missing Out on a Huge Market in Transferring Money to the World’s Poor

  • By
  • Anjana Ravi,
  • Nicole Tosh,
  • New America Foundation
November 21, 2012 |

Mobile money has an estimated potential worldwide revenue of $1 trillion within the next three years, and has become the “it” technology of the moment. The ability to send and receive money through cell phones simplifies the transaction process and offers customers both mobility and flexibility in managing their money. The most notable mobile money platform in the developing world, Kenya’s M-PESA, had 17 million subscribers as of December 2011, and other countries throughout the developed and developing world are quickly jumping on the bandwagon.

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