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Regions & Nations

Francis Fukuyama: End of History Still in Sight Despite China's Rise | The Huffington Post

  • By
  • Francis Fukuyama,
  • New America Foundation
July 9, 2014 |
This interview [with Francis Fukuyama] is part of The Stanford Daily's "Ideas of an International Order" series which explores the potential for evolving and contrasting concepts of an international system in the 21st century, and what America can or should do in response.
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Obama's Visit: Embrace the Victory of Politics Over Substance

  • By
  • Daniel Levy,
  • New America Foundation
March 18, 2013 |

It was not always thus. Despite the characteristic sense of entitlement conveyed by many in the Israeli elite in advance of Barack Obama’s first presidential visit: “You finally made it, what took you so long?” the must-go-to-Israel clause in the U.S. presidential contract is of surprisingly recent vintage. Next week marks the ninth visit by a sitting U.S .President. But half of those previous eight trips were notched-up by Bill Clinton alone, and another two by George W. Bush in his very last year in office (yes, he waited eight years to say "Hi" in person).

What Went Right?

  • By
  • Peter Bergen,
  • New America Foundation
March 5, 2013 |

Quick question: Which Asian country has seen its life expectancy go up an astounding 18 years in just one decade, while turning from one of the world's most rural countries into one of its fastest-urbanizing? Oh, and the country's GDP increased tenfold in that same period.No, this isn't Japan in the 1960s, Singapore in the 1970s, South Korea in the 1980s, or India in the 1990s. It is Afghanistan since the fall of the Taliban.

Cleaning up a Dirty War

  • By
  • Alexandra Starr,
  • New America Foundation
February 26, 2013 |

Human rights advocates were aided by the fact that, immediately following the fall of junta government in 1983, democratically-elected President Raul Alfonsín put top generals on trial and initiated a truth commission to investigate their legacy of political violence and repression. When the military threatened to take down the government, Alfonsín ended up pushing through what would be only the first round of amnesty laws, but the findings of the truth commission, published under the title Nunca Mas ("Never Again"), stunned the Argentine public.

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Sights and Sounds Along the U.S.-Mexico Border

  • By
  • Louie Palu,
  • New America Foundation

This slideshow traces a number of key points on the U.S.-Mexico border, from Laredo, Texas, and Ciudad Juarez in the east through Nogales (Arizona and Mexico), and Yuma, Arizona, and then north to Calexico, California and west to Tijuana, Mexico. Topics explored are the physical border and landscape, cross-border trade, security, immigration, drug trafficking and organized crime.

View multimedia here.

Laredo, Texas: Lucrative Trafficking

  • By
  • Louie Palu,
  • New America Foundation

What is fundamental to all drug traffickers from Mexico is to get drugs moving onto a U.S. highway and into a metropolitan city for distribution. Interstate 35 runs north from Laredo to San Antonio, Texas, a route that is strategic to the legitimate and illegitimate economy. Once across the border the value of drugs climbs as they are moved north. A kilo of uncut cocaine in the U.S. could start at $18,500 a couple of hundred miles from the border but might increase in value to $32,000 further north. Prices vary depending on the amount purchased, the quality and the location.

The U.S. Border and Customs Patrol in Laredo, Texas

  • By
  • Louie Palu,
  • New America Foundation

Presenting a view of the main U.S. ports of entry into Laredo, Texas, this slideshow shows inspection areas operated by the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol. It explores several aspects of U.S. border security, trade and border economics, and drug trafficking.

View full article and multimedia.

Election Day in Monterrey, Mexico

  • By
  • Louie Palu,
  • New America Foundation

The city of Monterrey located in the border state of Nuevo Leon is considered the main entry route to several major drug trafficking plazas including Nuevo Laredo and Reynosa—a forward-operating base for the Zeta drug cartel and a port of entry to their area of influence for their smuggling routes in the northeast. It also serves as a first line of defense against any incursions into their territory. Monterrey is Mexico’s second richest city with much of its wealthy economy directly tied to trade on the border.

Ciudad Juarez: Local Police, Federales and Drug Cartels

  • By
  • Louie Palu,
  • New America Foundation

In December 2011, when I was in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, multiple murders occurred on an almost daily basis as sicarios—assassins—“heated up the plaza,” the term used when one rival crime group enters another’s turf, killing and causing havoc. But, as I drive through Juarez in July 2012 it’s hard to imagine the past slaughter. There are signs that things are turning around with new businesses opening.

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