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Broadcasters Fear the Music In Aereo Fight | TheStreet.com

May 17, 2013

Benjamin Lennett, a policy analyst at the New America Foundation in Washington, reminds the big media companies that consumers are willing to pay for content provided it's the content they really want. "Ideally, media companies would learn from the ...

Who Killed the Pension Plan? | TheStreet.com

November 15, 2011

A forum last week -- "Retirement Heist: Overlooked Causes of the Retirement Crisis," sponsored by the Pension Rights Center, the New America Foundation and AARP -- looked at the many questions surrounding defined-benefit plans: What has been killing ...

Chains Are Off in Social Security Debate | TheStreet.com

January 24, 2011

... "In our view, and the view basically of all economists, [the Social Security COLA freeze] is completely justified," says Marc Goldwein, policy director of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, as well as a senior policy analyst for the Fiscal Policy Program at the New America Foundation. ...

Original article

Terry Tamminen in TheStreet.com on Emissions Control, Companies

April 27, 2007

Earlier this month, ConocoPhillips the first domestic oil company to join the U.S. Climate Action Partnership, a corporate call-to-arms aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions...

Punting on Social Security Reform

  • By
  • Daniel Gross,
  • New America Foundation
December 11, 2001 |

Sounding an alarm bell about the nation's safety net -- "the system is not sustainable as currently structured" -- the report offered three potential options to set Social Security back on the road to insolvency. Each involved diverting a portion of Social Security payroll taxes out of government bonds (in which they're now invested) and into private accounts, which could hold stocks and bonds.

It concluded: "Carpe diem!"

Not Much Optimism Now

Washington Has the Wrong Medicine for Economic Stimulus

  • By
  • Daniel Gross,
  • New America Foundation
November 15, 2001 |

Since Sept. 11, investors have looked to Washington for leadership on three fronts: monetary, military and fiscal. Thus far, the Federal Reserve and the Pentagon have acquitted themselves admirably in meeting the first two challenges. The Fed aggressively slashed interest rates, and the military unleashed the fury of American air power on the Taliban.

Terror on Wall Street -- A Look at a 1920 Bombing

  • By
  • Daniel Gross,
  • New America Foundation
September 20, 2001 |

Last week, two hijacked planes pierced the heart of New York's financial world, but inspired an outpouring of heroic and patriotic responses. To many observers, the events recalled the 1993 World Trade Center bombing or the 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

To this history-minded financial journalist, the terrorist attack on the Twin Towers and the reaction to it calls to mind a September 1920 tragedy that took place just across the street from TheStreet.com's headquarters. Until last week, that event stood as the deadliest terror attack in New York City's long history.

Jumpin' Jiminy Jeffords

  • By
  • Daniel Gross,
  • New America Foundation
May 24, 2001 |

Until this morning, the only interest readers of TheStreet.com may have had in the career of Sen. James Jeffords of Vermont was purely trivial: Back when Adam Lashinsky was an infant journo, he was a tenant in the erstwhile Republican's Capitol Hill row house.

Today, however, Jeffords has burst into our consciousness the way Christina Aguilera burst on to the Top-40 charts. The question on investors' minds is, does this change everything?

Capital Games?

  • By
  • Daniel Gross,
  • New America Foundation
March 20, 2001 |

The market giveth and the market taketh away. Investors large and small have learned this homily in the past year. Washington politicians -- on both sides of the aisle -- may soon be singing from the same hymnal.

Republicans believe the declining markets will boost momentum for President Bush's tax cut, now referred to by Bush spokesman Ari Fleischer as an "economic recovery" plan.

Yet More Sickening Health Care Bickering

  • By
  • Daniel Gross,
  • New America Foundation
December 21, 2000 |

The economic stimulus bill is dead, and blame is being cast about in Washington like so many lines off a Jersey shore charter. But the biggest losers may not be Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle and House Speaker Dennis Hastert.

No, the debacle's largest victims may prove to be giant health insurance companies, like Aetna, UnitedHealth Group and Oxford Health Plans .

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