The Washington Monthly

Pinkertons at DHS

  • By
  • T.A. Frank,
  • New America Foundation
July 1, 2008 |

In November 2005, hotel employees in the city of Emeryville, California got some good news. Local voters had passed a “living wage” law requiring hotels to pay workers a minimum of nine dollars per hour plus extra for certain duties. In an expensive town--Emeryville occupies a narrow peninsula in the San Francisco Bay, making it attractive to tourists--this was welcome news. As the months went by, however, employees at one hotel, the Woodfin Suites, found that they were still being paid less than the law required. In September 2006 they went before the city council to complain about it.

Confessions Of a Sweatshop Inspector

  • By
  • T.A. Frank,
  • New America Foundation
April 29, 2008 |

I remember one particularly bad factory in China. It produced outdoor tables, parasols, and gazebos, and the place was a mess. Work floors were so crowded with production materials that I could barely make my way from one end to the other. In one area, where metals were being chemically treated, workers squatted at the edge of steaming pools as if contemplating a sudden, final swim. The dormitories were filthy: the hallways were strewn with garbage -- orange peels, tea leaves -- and the only way for anyone to bathe was to fill a bucket with cold water.

No Torture. No Exceptions.

  • By
  • Peter Bergen,
  • New America Foundation
March 1, 2008 |

In a Manhattan courtroom in May 2001, four men were convicted for their roles in al-Qaeda's bombings of the American embassies in Kenya and Tanzania three years earlier. The evidence against them had been collected without recourse to torture, coercion, or unorthodox interrogation techniques. The attacks had killed a dozen Americans and more than two hundred Africans, and family members of some of the victims attended the trial and testified about the devastating loss of their loved ones.

No Torture. No Exceptions.

  • By Gary Hart
March 1, 2008 |

The Treaty of Westphalia, which ended the Thirty Years War in 1648, effectively established an entity that most of us today take for granted: the nation-state. In the nation-state, it is the duty of the state to protect the nation and of the nation to remain loyal to the state. When security threats to the nation arise, the state must defend against them, and, in times of danger, liberty is often at odds with security. For authoritarian states, such tension is easily resolved: err on the side of security.

Ask Not!

  • By
  • Ted Widmer,
  • New America Foundation
January 1, 2008 |

John F. Kennedy is not running for anything in 2008, but you'd never know it. A front-page photo in the New York Times recently showed his electability in Serbia, of all places, where local candidates are vying to establish their credentials as the latest citizens of the New Frontier. Back in the U.S., no candidate has captured the reflected glory of JFK more than Barack Obama, thanks to his youth, eloquence, and message of change.

Done Right

  • By
  • Mark Schmitt,
  • New America Foundation
November 1, 2007 |

As even the most committed conservatives have begun to recognize the scale of the debacle, foreign and domestic, of the seven years during which they have held unchecked power, they have begun to plot a slick escape from the consequences. "Oh, that?" they will say. "That wasn't conservatism. That was something completely different." It started out as conservatism, they say, but was corrupted by the culture of Washington, by Jack Abramoff or Tom DeLay. Or, they say, so sorry, we misjudged George W. Bush, failed to see how incompetent he was.

Divide and Concur

  • By
  • Mark Schmitt,
  • New America Foundation
November 1, 2007 |

There's no doubt that America's political parties have undergone a major transformation in the last two decades, and that we now have, for better or for worse, a center-left party and a center-right party(although at the moment, more right than center), pitted against one another, rather than the jumble of the past. The question is whether this process, which Ron Brownstein, until recently a columnist for the Los Angeles Times, calls the "Great Sorting-Out," is a bad thing, a good thing, or just a fact of life that isn't going away.

Newtered

  • By
  • Shannon Brownlee,
  • New America Foundation
October 1, 2007 |

If you’ve never suffered the agony of low back pain, don’t worry -- chances are you will. About two-thirds of adults are hit with low back pain at some time in their lives, and for many the pain is sufficiently unbearable to send them hobbling into the doctor’s office. Yet although back pain is one of the most common conditions around, and although it costs billions of dollars each year in lost productivity, doctors still disagree over everything from how to diagnose the cause to what to do about it.

Best Care Everywhere

  • By
  • Phillip Longman,
  • New America Foundation
October 1, 2007 |

Back in July, while trying to justify his opposition to expanding government health care coverage for children, President Bush made a telling comment. The uninsured, he said, "have access to health care in America. After all, you just go to an emergency room."

Ben Adler Quotes Mead and Dannenberg on Higher Ed Lobby

September 1, 2007

Sara Mead and Michael Dannenberg are quoted in a Washington Monthly article by Ben Adler, the editor of CampusProgress.org, at the Center for American Progress. Adler examines the actions of higher ed lobby organizations and how they impact policy reform.

To read this article, please visit Washington Monthly's web site.

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