New America Policy Papers: 2001

Papers and other formal publications from our policy programs are available below. To jump to another year in the archives, please use the links at right.

Why We Must Talk About the Information Commons

  • By
  • David Bollier,
  • New America Foundation
November 1, 2001

If Stevenson was correct in his reinterpretation of Goethe—“That which you inherit from your fathers/You must earn in order to possess”—then the efflorescence of digital technologies over the past twenty years is posing some unprecedented challenges to our democratic polity. The computer, the Internet and any other digital technologies are dramatically changing the character oforganizations, markets, the nation-state and the global economy.

Spectrum: Allocations, Auctions, Public Revenues

  • By
  • Michael Calabrese,
  • New America Foundation
November 1, 2001
A PDF version of this document is available below for download.

The Great Airwaves Robbery

  • By
  • Michael Calabrese,
  • New America Foundation
November 1, 2001

Last December Sen. John McCain described the 1996 “loan” of a second TV channel to broadcasters – for the stated purpose of facilitating the transition to digital and high-definition television – as “one of the great rip offs in American history. They used to rob trains in the Old West, now we rob spectrum.”

Battle Over the Airwaves: Principles for Spectrum Policy Reform

  • By
  • Michael Calabrese,
  • New America Foundation
September 1, 2001

Today the American people collectively own the most valuable resource in the emerging information economy: the airwaves, also known as the electromagnetic spectrum. Auctions conducted last year in Europe and early this year in the U.S. suggest that spectrum occupied by commercial licensees has a market value well in excess of $300 billion.

The Impact of Labor Market Trends on Health and Pension Benefit Coverage and Inequality

  • By
  • Michael Calabrese,
  • New America Foundation
  • and James Medoff, Professor of Economics, Harvard University
June 1, 2001

This study examines labor market trends related to the receipt of health and pension benefits as compensation by private sector workers over the 19-year period from 1979 to 1998. This focus on trends in benefit coverage as compensation is important, among other reasons, because employerpaid benefits continue to be the primary source of both health insurance and of private retirement savings for the vast majority of Americans under 65 years of age.

Trends in Health Care Coverage and Inequality

  • By
  • Michael Calabrese,
  • New America Foundation
  • and James L. Medoff, Howard B. Shapiro and Andrew D. Harless
June 1, 2001

The large majority of American families with health insurance obtain their coverage
through an employer -- whether their own, their spouse's, or a parent's. Indeed, employersponsored
insurance (ESI), which covers nearly 63 percent of Americans, has served as the
foundation for the U.S. health insurance system for half a century.

Public Assets, Private Profits

  • By
  • David Bollier,
  • New America Foundation
March 1, 2001

Many of the resources that Americans own as a people — forests and minerals under public lands, public information and federally financed research, the broadcast airwaves and public institutions and traditions — are increasingly being taken over by private business interests. These appropriations of common assets are siphoning revenues from the public treasury, shifting ownership and control from public to private interests, and eroding democratic processes and shared cultural values.

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