RSS Feeds

Automatic Updates by Author, Issue or Program

RSS IconRSS offers an easy way to keep up with the latest from the New America Foundation. Simply sign up for the feeds that interest you with your favorite "feed reader," and our newest articles, policy papers and events will be delivered directly to your browser, desktop or email. (See below for more about RSS and how to use it.)

Our most popular feeds are listed below. There are dozens of additional RSS feeds available, however. You can find feeds for each New America Fellow and staff member on that individual's bio page. And you'll find that most items throughout this site are categorized with keywords that go beyond our main Key Issues -- "books," for example, or "unemployment" or "terrorism." Clicking on any of those terms will take you to a list of related content on NewAmerica.net -- and to a link for subscribing to that RSS feed.

We hope that you find this service useful, and encourage you to contact us with any questions or suggestions.

RSS feed for all future events All Future Events
RSS feed for all articles All Articles & Op-Eds
Podcasts
 RSS feed for all policy papers All Policy Papers
RSS feed for all press releases All Press Releases
RSS feed for all In the News items All In the News Items

By Program

RSS feed for this program Bernard L. Schwartz Fellows Program
RSS feed for this program New America in California
RSS feed for this program American Strategy
RSS feed for this program Asset Building
RSS feed for this program Climate Policy Program
RSS feed for this program College Savings Initiative
RSS feed for this program Economic Growth
RSS feed for this program Education Policy
RSS feed for this program Energy Policy Initiative
RSS feed for this program Fiscal Policy
RSS feed for this program Global Assets Project
RSS feed for this program Health Policy
RSS feed for this program Media Policy Initiative
RSS feed for this program Political Reform
RSS feed for this program Open Technology Initiative
RSS feed for this program Wireless Future
RSS feed for this program Workforce and Family

 

By Key Issue

RSS feed for this issue Economic Growth
RSS feed for this issue Education
RSS feed for this issue Energy & Environment
RSS feed for this issue Family & Children
RSS feed for this issue Fiscal Policy
RSS feed for this issue Foreign Policy
RSS feed for this issue Health Policy
RSS feed for this issue Media and Public Opinion
RSS feed for this issue National Security
RSS feed for this issue Ownership & Assets
RSS feed for this issue Political Reform
RSS feed for this issue Retirement Security
RSS feed for this issue Telecom & Technology
RSS feed for this issue Trade & Globalization

How to Use RSS

Depending on whom you believe, RSS stands for either "Really Simple Syndication" or "Rich Site Summary." Either way, it offers an easy way to stay current on the news that interests you, without having to repeatedly check back at a Web site for updates.

Using RSS, however, requires a "reader" -- software that automatically grabs the feed for you, displays the headlines and summaries, and provides links back to the Web page that contais the full article or document. There are hundreds of different readers available (many of them free), but all boil down to four basic options:

  • Reading RSS in your Web browser
  • Reading RSS in your e-mail
  • Using a stand-alone RSS Reader
  • Using a Web-based service

Most current Web browsers have built-in RSS readers (Internet Explorer is the exception, although this will change with the forthcoming IE7), and countless "plug-ins" or "extensions" are available to add additional RSS options. If you use a browser other than Internet Explorer, the "Help" menu can get you started.

E-mail integration is less common, but very useful for those who check their in-box far more often than they surf the Web. (Mozilla's Thunderbird e-mail program does integrate RSS, and can be downloaded for free.) And stand-alone programs, while they often offer features not available in the "built-in" Web and e-mail approaches, generally make sense only for the experience "power user."

For the novice, a Web-based service is probably the easiest way to explore RSS -- there is no software to install or learn, and the added benefit of being able to access your feeds from any computer that has Internet access. Bloglines and Google Reader are perhaps the most popular "feed-reader" services, while both Google and Yahoo allow users to add RSS feeds to personalized home pages.

Whichever approach you choose, just follow the start-up instructions, subscribe to a few RSS feeds that interest you, and begin getting the news that interests you delivered on your schedule.

Need to know more? The following links to outside resources can help get you started: