New America in the News: 2014

New America staff and fellows appear regularly on radio and television, and are frequently quoted in media outlets of all types. A selection of that coverage is available below.

Teachers, Principals Adjust to State's Continual Education Changes | Tampa Bay Times

January 22, 2014

Florida's circumstance, and its difficulties, are not unusual.

"Given the degree of change, the simultaneous timing of these reforms, and their interconnectedness, many states — Florida included — are struggling to form a long-term plan, and for good reason. They are essentially creating an elaborate Rube Goldberg machine," said Anne Hyslop, an education policy analyst for New America Foundation.

The resulting educator angst should not come as a surprise, Hyslop suggested.

Renowned Military Analyst Praises Robert Gates’ Memoir | Here & Now

January 21, 2014

Thomas Ricks is the author of five books about the U.S. military and says the new book by former Defense Secretary Robert Gates is “probably one of the best Washington memoirs ever.”

Ricks makes that case by asserting that Gates’ new book names names and offers insight into the difficult decisions that were made by the two presidents Gates served, George W. Bush and Barack Obama.

Ukraine’s 1984 Moment: Government Using Cellphones to Track Protesters | The Washington Post

January 21, 2014

Cell site location data is considered metadata. The U.S. government denies that it is currently tracking mobile phone locations domestically, although it admits to running a test project on the subject in recent years. And documents leaked by former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden show the NSA tracks 5 billion mobile device locations daily around the world.

Making the Case for Paternity Leave | Minnesota Public Radio

January 21, 2014

Conversations about work-life balance often center on mothers.

Click here to listen to the full segment.

Washington Conundrum: Where to Stockpile Mountains of NSA Data? | The Nation

January 21, 2014

Meanwhile, privacy advocates said they doubt that the reforms go far enough. The head of the American Civil Liberties Union said the only real solution to resolving the nation’s data collection problem was to end the program altogether.

New York's All-Day Pre-K Plan: Good News For Teachers? | Huffington Post

January 21, 2014

... a student-teacher ratio of 10-to-1, with classrooms that would pair 20 pre-K students with a teacher and an aide, according to Conor Williams, an education policy analyst with the centrist New America Foundation and a former first-grade teacher in ...

Digital Literacy at Forefront of Digital Inclusion Efforts | Knight Digital Media Center

January 20, 2014

For community foundations concerned about issues of the digital divide, keeping programs local and steady could be the key for progress in a landscape muddied by previous missteps. The urgency is real as research by the Open Technology Institute indicates that residents and businesses in U.S. cities pay more for slower speeds by comparison with other cities around the world. Fast, affordable and accessible Internet is increasingly necessary as information essential to strong communities moves online.

Obama's Indian American Ex-Aide Joins Think Tank | Indolink

January 20, 2014

"Anish is a respected expert on South Asia and has made important contributions to scholarship on the region," said Peter Bergen, Director of New America's National Security Programme. "We are delighted to have him with us." Goel currently serves as ...

New York’s All-Day Pre-K Plan: Good News for Teachers? | In These Times

January 19, 2014

So the numbers floated for New York are still in the air; but based on general research on effective early education, the city should reasonably aim for a student-teacher ratio of 10-to-1, with classrooms that would pair 20 pre-K students with a teacher and an aide, according to Conor Williams, an education policy analyst with the centrist New America Foundation and a former first-grade teacher in Brooklyn. To make the program effective in the long term, he says, the city will need to hire “a lot of really highly trained, effective people to do this work. ...

Renaming ‘Common Core’ Standards Does Little to End Education Debate | The Miami Herald

January 18, 2014

But is Florida really moving away from the national benchmarks, which have drawn Tea Party ire in recent months? Or are the suggested revisions a matter of semantics?

“At their heart, the standards in Florida are still Common Core standards,” said Anne Hyslop, a policy analyst with New America Foundation’s Education Policy Program, noting that many of the proposed changes are minor.

Hyslop added: “The rebranding and messaging is largely political.”

Obama Says Nsa's Mass Collection Of U.S. Phone Data Will End | Wall Street Journal

January 17, 2014

"Although we're heartened by many of the positive steps that the president outlined today, many key questions and reforms were left unaddressed, and many controversies punted to Congress or to other government officials," said Sascha Meinrath, Director ...

What They’re Saying About Obama’s NSA Speech | The Washington Post

January 17, 2014

“If the ultimate alternative to government collection is mandatory bulk data retention by the phone companies or mandatory bulk handover to a third party, the president should be prepared for a major legislative battle with key members of Congress, the technology industry and the privacy community arrayed against him.” — Kevin Bankston of the New America Foundation’s Open Technology Institute

Obama to Unveil Post-Snowden NSA Spying Reforms | France 24

January 17, 2014

Kevin Bankston, policy director of the Open Technology Institute at the New America Foundation, warned that if Obama did not announce specific reforms, the battle would shift to Congress.

"If he does fail to take a stand and exercise the bold leadership that is necessary it will become Congress's responsibility to step into the breach and we look forward to working with them to do so," Bankston said.

Click here to read the full article.

Why Obama’s NSA Reforms Won’t End the Privacy Debate | Think Progress

January 17, 2014

Obama went some ways towards limiting access to the data. He said that the NSA would “only pursue phone calls that are two steps removed from a number associated with a terrorist organization instead of three,” a serious reduction in scope. He also proposed steps to ensure that “the database can be queried only after a judicial finding, or in a true emergency.”

Rights Groups: Obama NSA Reform is First Small Step | AFP

January 17, 2014

Civil liberties and digital rights groups gave a lukewarm welcome to President Barack Obama's plan to curb US surveillance programs Friday, warning it only partly addressed critical privacy concerns.

While activists generally welcomed moves to limit the powers of the US National Security Agency, notably in bulk collection of phone records, but said this should be only the start of the reform effort.

Obama to End NSA Data Collection 'As It Currently Exists' | The Hill

January 17, 2014

President Obama will announce on Friday an overhaul of the controversial National Security Agency surveillance program that collects the telephone records of American citizens, according to a senior administration official.

Speaking at the Justice Department, Obama will say he is ordering an end to the telephone metadata “as it currently exists, and move to a program that preserves the capabilities we need without the government holding this bulk meta-data,” the official said.

Obama Says NSA's Mass Collection of U.S. Phone Data Will End | The Wall Street Journal

January 17, 2014

Still, many privacy advocates said Mr. Obama's plans remained incomplete.

"Although we're heartened by many of the positive steps that the president outlined today, many key questions and reforms were left unaddressed, and many controversies punted to Congress or to other government officials," said Sascha Meinrath, Director of the New America Foundation's Open Technology Institute.

Obama's (Still) Unanswered Question on Phone Spying | The National Journal

January 17, 2014

Kevin Bankston, a policy director for the New American Foundation, said that if the alternative to government storage is mandatory data retention or a requirement for phone companies to turn the data over to some other third party, "the President should be prepared for a major legislative battle with key members of Congress, the technology industry and the privacy community arrayed against him."

The President Will Replace NSA Mass Surveillance With...Something | Bloomberg Businessweek

January 17, 2014

The president’s reform panel suggested that phone companies themselves hold onto the data. If that isn’t workable, a new governmental entity could be created to maintain it. Both approaches present challenges, Obama acknowledged, especially if they result in asking private organizations to collect or retain data in new ways. “If that’s the way they’re going, they’re going to have a battle on their hands,” says Kevin Bankston, policy director of the New America Foundation’s Open Technology Institute.

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