Flexible Work Arrangements and Low-Wage Work

Creating Opportunity for Low-Wage Workers

Low-wage workers are some of America's most vulnerable workers. In addition to the problem of having low wages, many have little input into the hours that they work and many have unpredictable work schedules, with the timing and amount of work hours fluctuating from week to week. A cascade of negative consequences can flow from being unable to alter work schedules or know them in advance - including unstable child care; difficulty accessing work supports and job training; transportation problems; inability to hold down a second job; loss of wages and job loss.

Flexible work arrangements (FWAs) - including both employee input into scheduling and predictable work schedules - are an important part of the solution to these problems for low-wage workers and for employers. Come join the New America Foundation's Workforce and Family Program and Workplace Flexibility 2010 of Georgetown University Law Center as our panelists present the latest research on scheduling challenges faced by low-wage workers, highlight common sense solutions that have been implemented by businesses and discuss how public policy can enhance access to FWAs for low-wage workers.

Location

New America Foundation
1899 L Street NW 4th Floor
Washington, DC, 20036
See map: Google Maps

Participants

Susan J. Lambert
Associate Professor, University of Chicago

Jennifer E. Swanberg
Executive Director, Institute for Workplace Innovation
Associate Professor, University of Kentucky

Elizabeth Lower-Basch
Senior Policy Analyst, Center for Law and Social Policy

Liz Watson
Legislative Counsel, Workplace Flexibility 2010

John Wilcox
Vice President of Operations, Corporate Voices for Working Families

Moderator
David Gray
Director, Workforce and Program, New America Foundation

Event Time and Location

Wednesday, July 8, 2009 - 12:30pm - 2:00pm

Event Photos

A range of photos from this event are available on Flickr. Click on the icon at left to view or download the photos.